Zine Grab ‘n Go Kit

It’s still COVID Times, so the hands-on, community-building aspects of zine making can be less than ideal. That’s why I love this Chicago Public Library grab and go kit for kids and tweens that talks about how to make a zine at home. The kit comes in a plastic bag and includes pages for collaging, a glue stick, and a copy of “How to Make a One-Page Zine” by Sarah Mirk (get a free copy at Sarah Mirk’s website). Patrons need to supply scissors, paper, and a writing instrument.

photo of a zine kit in a plastic bag with a piece of paper describing how to make a zine

Check out the video from zine librarian Alenka Figa sharing different types of zines and giving a tutorial about how to make a one-page zine out of a piece of scrap paper.

“How Zines Can Help You Document Social Justice Movements”

Cristina Favretto, Head of Special Collections at the University of Miami Libraries, gave a great presentation on the history of zines on October 21: “All You Need is Paper and Passion: How Zines Can Help You Document Social Justice Movements.” The presentation also had suggestions for building relevant and responsive zine collections.

The session recording and the slides are now available.screenshot of presentation with title screen "All you need is paper and passion"

IZLD 2020 recordings & notes available

International Zine Library Day 2020, held on July 21, was a great success! If you missed any of the content (there was a lot!), you can find notes from each of the sessions, as well as video recordings of many sessions, here: http://zinelibraries.info/wiki/izld-2020-online-event-notes-and-recordings. Congratulations to the organizers for such a fun-filled event!

Check back for more information about the Zine Librarians unConference, to be held later in 2020.

Contemporary Collecting: DIY Publishing webinar

The Bibliographical Society of America hosted a webinar on July 28 about DIY Publishing. Miarosa Ciallella, a zinester and library worker, talks about zines as activism and zines as a way to resist technocracy. Ciallella talks about how we know that social media is oppressive and how zines are “micro-archives that reflect and reject dominant narratives of historical moments.” Ciallella argues that we should start mentally investing in DIY print culture as a way to document history. (The other half of the presentation, about real estate flyers, is also interesting, though not as relevant to this site!)

Find the full description of this presentation at: memberplanet.com/events/bsa/contemp-collecting-diy and the recording at youtube.com/watch?v=BqxLE0zh5Xo.

screenshot of a slide reading "Technology and zines" with points including algorithmic bias and zines as micro-archives of experience

Quaranzines in library collections

screenshot of the article written, along with a photo of a zine

Zine librarian and librarian Gina Murrell wrote a story for Library Journal called Libraries Collect COVID-19 Stories in Quaranzines on June 1st. She talks about how zines have allowed creators to process the difficult thoughts and emotions surrounding the COVID-19 pandemic. Find the article at libraryjournal.com/?detailStory=Libraries-Collect-COVID-19-Stories-Quaranzines.

ZLuC 2020 moving online

This year’s Zine Librarians unConference, ZLuC 2020, in Montréal has been cancelled due to COVID-19. But zine librarians from around the world are working on a virtual version of the event! http://zinelibraries.info/wiki/zluc2020/ If you’re interested in attending, stay tuned. If you’re interested in helping organize this event, please get in touch! In the meantime, join us on July 21 for a special event, being decided by ZLuC organizers right now!

ZLuC 2021 site announced

The site selection committee is excited to announce that the Zine Librarians unConference 2021 will be held in San Francisco! The Gleeson Zine Collective at the University of San Francisco will be the core organizers and they will be partnering with community organizations in the area.
Big thanks to this year’s site selection committee, Juli Huddleston, Joshua Barton, Lauren Brewer, and Ari Zickau.
For more information on ZLuC, check out zinelibraries.info/events/zine-librarian-unconferences.

“From Indie to Institution” article

This From Indie to Institution article in The Harvard Crimson by Elyse D. Pham describes the differing environments of the zine collections of the Papercut Zine Library and Harvard’s Schlesinger Library. Though the institutions are less than a mile apart in Cambridge, Massachusetts, their differing focus is clear, with preservation and research access being key at Schlesinger while Papercut establishes a more reader-friendly vibe. The article is a short but excellent description of the wide range of what a zine library can be!

screenshot of article title and byline along with large image of zine library shelves