ZLUC 2023 San Francisco

The 2023 Zine Librarian unConference (ZLuC) will be held San Francisco!

What: ZLuC is an inspirational, informative, and fun gathering of people who care deeply about zines and their ability to change lives for the better.

Where: the University of San Francisco (and hopefully other venues!)

When: to be announced (watch this space)

Who: Everyone is welcome! The primary audience is workers and volunteers from academic, public, and special libraries, as well as community-oriented independent libraries and archives. If you’re interested in zines in libraries and archives, we’re happy to have you join in the fun.

Why: To share the zine love!

Teaching With Zines — IZL(u)C 2020

This page has resources from the Teaching With Zines session.

Before our session, we invite you to take 5 or 10 minutes to reflect on the following questions. (You can also download and print a zineier version here.)

So you wanna teach with zines! That’s great. Here are some questions to help you think through a zine activity, whether it is a standalone thang or part of a longer-term course or series. You might answer all of these questions, or just a few. 

  • What do you want people to learn? This could be a specific skill, some information, or even a set of feelings.
  • How do you see zines fitting into that? For example, as content (they’re legit learning about zines as zines), as a container for content (they’re learning about cooking by reading zines), or as a container for sharing what they’ve learned (making a zine about science they’ve learned), or something else altogether?
  • Who are your learners or your audience? What is important to know about them?
  • What’s the timeframe? For example, will this all happen in one hour, or be spread over a series of meetings?
  • What do you need to make it happen? Say, a long-arm stapler, or ideas for potential topics, or a stack of kid-friendly zines to browse.
  • Write out the steps for what you expect learners to do:
  • What are you worried about?
  • What are you excited about?
  • How will you know if it worked?

Additional resources

There’s a whole page on this very website filled with resources for teaching with zines: http://zinelibraries.info/running-a-zine-library/teaching-with-zines/. You can also download the Teaching With Zines zine (pdf).

Cover of the Teaching With Zines zine

This zine features recommendations for teaching with zines for all different ages and audiences.

If you’re working with children, this post about zines for kids may be helpful.

Our panelists recommended the following:

Barnard Zine Library:  https://zines.barnard.edu/

 

 

Meeting Accessibility Best Practices

General Resources

Closed Captions for meetings

  • All presenters should be encouraged to use a web captioner.  Alternatively, program attendees can use the captioner on their own devices (which will require using a separate browser from Zoom).  Suggested captioning software:

Making the presentation accessible

  • Have well defined roles and responsibilities:
    • Presenter(s)
    • Note Taker(s)
    • Facilitator/Coordinator(s) (Representatives from IZLuC who could be co-host of meeting)
    • Chat monitor
  • Include broad trigger/content warnings at prior to or at the beginning of the session if potentially sensitive topics are being discussed
  • To minimize cognitive load for larger meetings, it is suggested that most attendees turn off their video (except for the designated roles above and anyone who is controlling the floor, i.e. participant asking a question, which there should only be one person at a time holding the floor) with a max of four videos shared at any one time.
  • Establish clear and consistent ways for audience participation: i.e. use the chat and raise hand function of Zoom (please note that the raise hand tool is limited because it is difficult to see the order in which hands are raised).
  • Try and minimize your background noise when/if you are speaking or facilitating. Utilize the Spotlight feature when possible/necessary

Presentation materials best practices

  • Make presentation materials accessible:
    • Share slides/documents or other shared materials before the presentation
    • Ensure that the materials are built accessibly, i.e. heading structure, alt text for images, avoid big blocks of text, and do not use acronyms or jargon, etc.  Automated tools available for this include built in accessibility software like Microsoft suite or Grackle for Google or Adobe Pro DC.
  • Speak clearly and slowly.  Take pauses and breaks to check in with the audience.
  • Verbally describe any visuals you use, i.e. an image on a PPT slide should be described for audience members that may not be able to visually see the image.

Recording the meeting

  • Let the audience know the meeting is being recorded.
  • Provide captioning and transcript.

 

Social Media Accessibility Best Practices

General Resources

  • Guidelines for Creating Image Descriptions via American Anthropological Association
    • Includes an explanation of the difference between alt text, image descriptions, and captions
  • Use Instagram Threads to create automatic captioning for your videos that you can then download to your device (can also upload existing videos);
    • IGTV videos also have an automatic captioning feature

Consent to Post

  • Do I have permission from the creator to feature their work in a social media post and/or tag them?

Accessible Content

  • Does the order of content in an Instagram Stories post, multi-photo post, and/or Twitter thread make sense?
  • Did I capitalize the first letter of each new word when using hashtags?  Often referred to as “Camel Case.”
  • Can I use a link shortener when posting long links?
  • Can I indicate what kind of link it is/where it will be taking users? Ex. www.content.com/388 [form]
  • Did I use acronyms or other terms that may need to be explained?

Alt Text and Image Descriptions

  • Have I written alt text for all images for users using screen readers?
  • Have I written and included an image description for each image?

Video captions and Audio Transcripts

  • Can I include captions in the video?
  • If not, can I include a transcript of the video or make it available via another publicly available file/link?

IZLuC 2020 – Sunday, 1 November

Programming blocks are color-coded to help you find sessions that are live during a time convenient where you are. The Blue Scissors Block begins each day around late morning if your time zone is near the Melbourne time zone. The Yellow Photocopier Block begins each day around late morning if you are in a time zone that lines up with Mumbai’s. The Pink Stapler Block begins in late morning each day if you are in a time zone close to Berlin’s. The Purple Glue Stick Block aligns with late morning in places that line up near the longitude of Los Angeles. For more information and to find your UTC time zone code, check out this tool:
https://www.timeanddate.com/worldclock/converter.html

To confuse things, the clocks in the US go back on Sunday at 2am – which is why you’ll see that from the yellow photocopier block onwards, the time relative to UTC has changed! Don’t get caught out!

Block Local Time UTC
Blue Scissors Block 11:00 – 14:30
Melbourne, Australia
00:00 – 03:30
Yellow Photocopier Block 10:30 – 14:00
Mumbai, India
05:00 – 08:30
Pink Stapler Block 11:00 – 14:30
Berlin, Germany
10:00 – 13:30
Purple Glue Stick Block 11:00 – 14:30
Los Angeles, U.S.
18:00 – 21:30

All programming will be in English unless otherwise noted. There are 15 minute breaks built into blocks between talks, tours and unconference sessions.

Sunday, 1st November

00:00 – 03:30 UTC – Blue Scissors Block 3

Register Here

Los Angeles (UTC -7) Milwaukee (UTC-5) Baltimore (UTC -4) Edinburgh UTC-0 Athens (UTC +2) Mumbai (UTC +5:30) Kyoto (UTC +9) Melbourne (UTC +11)
Sat Oct 31st,  5:00 PM Sat Oct 31st, 7:00 PM Sat Oct 31st, 8:00 PM Sunday Nov 1st, 12:00 AM Sunday Nov 1st, 2:00 AM Sunday Nov 1st, 5:30 AM Sunday Nov 1st, 9:00 AM Sunday Nov 1st,11:00 AM

Bilingual Zine Workshop with Yago Cura of Hinchas Press

https://linktr.ee/HINCHAS_Press

Yago Cura of Hinchas Press will talk about the James Foley Scriptorium project and then facilitate a hands-on workshop. This bilingual zine workshop aims to share the language acquisition capacity of 6-fold zines, in and out of the classroom, while illustrating several generative trajectories that zinesters can take to satiate their language-nerding. The workshop will not only impart best practices for making polyglot zines, but provide several made by HINCHAS Press and used in workshops, classroom, and public library programming. This workshop will be followed by two hours of unconference sessions.

What’s an Unconference session?

An unconference session is a space where the topic and form of discussion is decided by the people in the (zoom) room. For a better idea of what, why and how, see: http://zinelibraries.info/wiki/zluc2020/unconference-sessions/

05:00 – 08:30 UTC – Yellow Photocopier Block 3

Register Here

Los Angeles (UTC -7) Milwaukee (UTC-5) Baltimore (UTC -4) Edinburgh UTC-0 Athens (UTC +2) Mumbai (UTC +5:30) Kyoto (UTC +9) Melbourne (UTC +11)
Saturday Oct 31st, 10:00 PM Saturday Oct 31st, 12:00AM Sunday Nov 1st, 1:00 AM Sunday Nov 1st, 5:00 AM Sunday Nov 1st, 7:00 AM Sunday Nov 1st, 10:30 AM Sunday Nov 1st, 14:00 PM Sunday Nov 1st, 4:00 PM

Athens Zine Bibliotheque Tour
Presented by Panayiota and Tassos – https://theathenszinebibliotheque.gr/
@theathenszinebibliotheque (ig)

Join Panayiota & Tassos from the Athens Zine Bibliotheque for a tour of their space, and some zines from their collection. This tour will be prerecorded with closed captions. This will be followed by a live Q&A, and then two hours of unconference sessions.

What’s an Unconference session?

An unconference session is a space where the topic and form of discussion is decided by the people in the (zoom) room. For a better idea of what, why and how, see: http://zinelibraries.info/wiki/zluc2020/unconference-sessions/

 

10:00 – 13:30 UTC – Pink Stapler Block 3

Register Here

Los Angeles (UTC -8) Milwaukee (UTC-6) Baltimore (UTC -5) Edinburgh UTC-0 Athens (UTC +2) Mumbai (UTC +5:30) Kyoto (UTC +9) Melbourne (UTC +11)
Sunday Nov 1st, 2:00 AM Sunday Nov 1st, 4:00 AM Sunday Nov 1st, 5:00 AM Sunday Nov 1st, 10:00 AM Sunday Nov 1st, 12:00 AM Sunday Nov 1st, 3:30 PM Sunday Nov 1st, 7:00 PM Sunday Nov 1st, 9:00 PM

Zinedabaad Collective – @zinedabaad (ig)

Presenters: Riya and Devashree

Join Riya and Devashree from the Zinedabaad Collective to hear about the history of self-publishing in India and what led them to it.

This will be followed by two hour long unconference sessions in a space facilitated by Zinedabaad. The first will draw from the talk to broadly look at tracing our relationships with zines and self-publishing. The second will be a discussion and hands on exploration of the questions raised throughout this block – expect some zine making, so come prepared with paper and your zine crafting tools of choice.

What’s an Unconference session?

An unconference session is a space where the topic and form of discussion is decided by the people in the (zoom) room. For a better idea of what, why and how, see: http://zinelibraries.info/wiki/zluc2020/unconference-sessions/

18:00 – 21:30 UTC – Purple Glue Stick Block 3

Register Here

Los Angeles (UTC -8) Milwaukee (UTC-6) Baltimore (UTC -5) Edinburgh UTC-0 Athens (UTC +2) Mumbai (UTC +5:30) Kyoto (UTC +9) Melbourne (UTC +11)
Sunday Nov 1st, 10:00 AM Sunday Nov 1st, 12:00 PM Sunday Nov 1st, 1:00 PM Sunday Nov 1st,  6:00 PM Sunday Nov 1st, 8:00 PM Sunday Nov 1st, 30 11:30 PM Monday Nov 2nd, 03:00 AM Monday Nov 2nd, 05:00 AM

Principles of Zine Cataloging

Presenters: Joshua Barton, Rhonda Kauffman, and Kelly Swickard

Join Joshua Barton (Michigan State Univ.), Rhonda Kauffman (Univ. of Connecticut), and Kelly Swickard (ProjectMUSE) as we philosophize on the principles and issues of cataloging zines. Topics will cover identifying creators, titles, subjects, and more. Perfect for a novice or experienced cataloger, curious or skeptical, this session will provide foundations for describing your own zine collection. This session will be followed by 2 hours of unconference sessions.

What’s an Unconference session?

An unconference session is a space where the topic and form of discussion is decided by the people in the (zoom) room. For a better idea of what, why and how, see: http://zinelibraries.info/wiki/zluc2020/unconference-sessions/

 

21:30 – 23:00 UTC – Rainbow Block One and Only

BONUS session: UnZineFest! 

Los Angeles (UTC -8) Milwaukee (UTC-6) Baltimore (UTC -5) Edinburgh UTC-0 Athens (UTC +2) Mumbai (UTC +5:30) Kyoto (UTC +9) Melbourne (UTC +11)
Sunday Nov 1st, 1:30 PM Sunday Nov 1st, 3:30 PM Sunday Nov 1st, 4:30 PM Sunday Nov 1st,  9:30 PM Sunday Nov 1st, 11:30 PM Monday Nov 2nd, 3:00 AM Monday Nov 2nd, 6:30 AM Monday Nov 2nd, 8:30 AM

To close out this year’s International Zine Librarians (un)Conference, please come say hello to some amazing zinesters as they share their creations and informally chat about zinemaking. Tablers include Hope Amico, Charlie Birch, Jonas Cannon, Kassi Grace, Avy Jetter, David Lasky, Liz Mason, Liz Yerby, and Ziba of ZebraRadar Zine. Brown Recluse Zine Distro will also be represented in some capacity. More tablers being added soon!

>>>>>Friday, 30 October Schedule >>>> Saturday, 31 October Schedule

IZLuC 2020 Saturday, 31th October

Programming blocks are color-coded to help you find sessions that are live during a time convenient where you are. The Blue Scissors Block begins each day around late morning if your time zone is near the Melbourne time zone. The Yellow Photocopier Block begins each day around late morning if you are in a time zone that lines up with Mumbai’s. The Pink Stapler Block begins in late morning each day if you are in a time zone close to Berlin’s. The Purple Glue Stick Block aligns with late morning in places that line up near the longitude of Los Angeles. For more information and to find your UTC time zone code, check out this tool:
https://www.timeanddate.com/worldclock/converter.html

Block Local Time UTC
Blue Scissors Block 11:00 – 14:30
Melbourne, Australia
00:00 – 03:30
Yellow Photocopier Block 10:30 – 14:00
Mumbai, India
05:00 – 08:30
Pink Stapler Block 11:00 – 14:30
Berlin, Germany
10:00 – 13:30
Purple Glue Stick Block 11:00 – 14:30
Los Angeles, U.S.
18:00 – 21:30

All programming will be in English unless otherwise noted. There are 15 minute breaks built into blocks between talks, tours and unconference sessions.

Saturday, 31st October

00:00 – 03:30 UTC – Blue Scissors Block 2

Register Here

Los Angeles (UTC -7) Milwaukee (UTC-5) Baltimore (UTC -4) Edinburgh UTC-0 Athens (UTC +2) Mumbai (UTC +5:30) Kyoto (UTC +9) Melbourne (UTC +11)
Friday, October 30 5:00 PM Friday, October 30 7:00 PM Friday, October 30 8:00 PM Sat, Oct 31 12:00 AM Sat, October 31 2:00 AM Sat October 31 5:30 AM Sat Oct 31 9:00 AM Sat Oct 31, 11:00 AM

 

The State of Zines in Australian Libraries Panel Discussion
Presenters: Dr Jessie Lymm, John Stevens, and Daniel Wee

While we know a lot about zine libraries in the UK and USA, what is happening with zines in libraries down here in Australia? What libraries are collecting zines? How are these being made available to the public? And what does the future look like for zines in Australian libraries and those who are passionate about them? Join a group of knowledgeable people on the subject: Dr Jessie Lymm, John Stevens, and Daniel Wee, in conversation with Kassi Grace. This will be followed by two hours of open unconference sessions.

The facilitator will be Kassi Grace

What’s an Unconference session?

An unconference session is a space where the topic and form of discussion is decided by the people in the (zoom) room. For a better idea of what, why and how, see: http://zinelibraries.info/wiki/zluc2020/unconference-sessions/

05:00 – 08:30 UTC – Yellow Photocopier Block 2

Register Here

Los Angeles (UTC -7) Milwaukee (UTC-5) Baltimore (UTC -4) Edinburgh UTC-0 Athens (UTC +2) Mumbai (UTC +5:30) Kyoto (UTC +9) Melbourne (UTC +11)
Fri, October 30 10:00 pm Sat, Oct 31st 12:00 AM Sat Oct 31st 1:00 AM Sat Oct 31st 5:00 AM Sat Oct 31st 7:00 AM Sat Oct 31st 10:30 AM Sat Oct 31st 2:00 PM Saturday, October 31 4:00 PM

Sister Library Tour
Presented by Aqui of Sister Library – @sister.library (ig)

Join us for this presentation from Aqui of Sister Library, along with a showing of a short documentary. This presentation will be followed by two hour-long open unconference sessions providing space to discuss the presentation and the questions, actions and topics raised as a group.

What’s an Unconference session?

An unconference session is a space where the topic and form of discussion is decided by the people in the (zoom) room. For a better idea of what, why and how, see: http://zinelibraries.info/wiki/zluc2020/unconference-sessions/

 

10:00 – 13:30 UTC – Pink Stapler Block 2

Register Here

Los Angeles (UTC -7) Milwaukee (UTC-5) Baltimore (UTC -4) Edinburgh UTC-0 Athens (UTC +2) Mumbai (UTC +5:30) Kyoto (UTC +9) Melbourne (UTC +11)
Sat Oct 31st 3:00 AM Sat Oct 31st 5:00 AM Sat Oct 31st 6:00 AM Sat Oct 31st 10:00 AM Sat Oct 31st 12:00 PM Sat Oct 31st 3:30 PM Sat Oct 31st 7:00 PM Sat Oct 31st 9:00 PM

Archiv der Jugendkulturen and Museum of Youth Culture

Presented by Lisa Schug and Daniel Schneider from @archiv_der_jugendkulturen (ig) and El Affleck from the Museum of Youth Culture, UK

Join Lisa Schug & Daniel Schneider from the Archiv der Jugendkulturen, Berlin, and El Affleck from the Museum of Youth Culture, UK, as they introduce us to zines in their collections, share their experiences and discuss the how, what and why of collecting youth cultures. This block will involve two pre-recorded tours of the respective collections, an unconference session, and end with a live Q&A.

What’s an Unconference session?

An unconference session is a space where the topic and form of discussion is decided by the people in the (zoom) room. For a better idea of what, why and how, see: http://zinelibraries.info/wiki/zluc2020/unconference-sessions/

18:00 – 21:30 UTC – Purple Glue Stick Block 2

Register Here

Los Angeles (UTC -7) Milwaukee (UTC-5) Baltimore (UTC -4) Edinburgh UTC-0 Athens (UTC +2) Mumbai (UTC +5:30) Kyoto (UTC +9) Melbourne (UTC +11)
Sat Oct 31st 11:00 AM Sat Oct 31st  1:00 PM Sat Oct 31st 2:00 PM Sat Oct 31st 6:00 PM Sat Oct 31st  8:00 PM Sat Oct 31st 11:30 PM Sun Nov 1st 03:00 AM Sun Nov 1st 05:00 AM

Lightning Talks! Smashing Zine Folks Giving Snappy Presentations

Presenters: Hope Amico, Amy Drayer, Violet Fox, Jenna Freedman, BluRaven C. Houvener​​​​​​​, Avy Jetter, Michelle Nitto, Raul Rodriguez, Aldiman Sinaga of PTK Distribution, and April Ibarra Siqueiros​​​​​​​

Please join us for a series of captivatingly concise five-minute talks related to zines and/or libraries! This will be followed by two hours of open unconference sessions.

The facilitator will be Kelsey Smith.

What’s an Unconference session?

An unconference session is a space where the topic and form of discussion is decided by the people in the (zoom) room. For a better idea of what, why and how, see: http://zinelibraries.info/wiki/zluc2020/unconference-sessions/

>>>>Friday, 30 October Schedule >>>Sunday, 1 November Schedule

IZLuC 2020 – Friday 30th October

Programming blocks are color-coded to help you find sessions that are live during a time convenient where you are. The Blue Scissors Block begins each day around late morning if your time zone is near the Melbourne time zone. The Yellow Photocopier Block begins each day around late morning if you are in a time zone that lines up with Mumbai’s. The Pink Stapler Block begins in late morning each day if you are in a time zone close to Berlin’s. The Purple Glue Stick Block aligns with late morning in places that line up near the longitude of Los Angeles. For more information and to find your UTC time zone code, check out this tool:
https://www.timeanddate.com/worldclock/converter.html

Block Local Time UTC
Blue Scissors Block 11:00 – 14:30
Melbourne, Australia
00:00 – 03:30
Yellow Photocopier Block 10:30 – 14:00
Mumbai, India
05:00 – 08:30
Pink Stapler Block 11:00 – 14:30
Berlin, Germany
10:00 – 13:30
Purple Glue Stick Block 11:00 – 14:30
Los Angeles, U.S.
18:00 – 21:30

All programming will be in English unless otherwise noted. There are 15 minute breaks built into blocks between talks, tours and unconference sessions.

Friday 30th October

00:00 – 03:30 UTC – Blue Scissors Block 1

Register Here

Los Angeles (UTC -7) Milwaukee (UTC-5) Baltimore (UTC -4) Edinburgh UTC-0 Athens (UTC +2) Mumbai (UTC +5:30) Kyoto (UTC +9) Melbourne (UTC +11)
Thursday, October 29 5:00 PM Thursday, October 29 7:00 PM Thursday, October 29 8:00 PM Friday, October 30 12:00 AM Friday, October 30 2:00 AM Friday, October 30 5:30 AM Friday, October 30 9:00 AM Friday, October 30 11:00 AM

 

Quarantine Zine Library
Presented by Sticky Institute
www.stickyinstitute.com

From Melbourne’s Sticky Institute comes a conversation about making and selling zines in the time of COVID-19. Sticky Institute is a zine shop and making space normally open in the subway under Flinders Street station in Melbourne. As the whole city closed to COVID-19 lockdown, the volunteers at Sticky created Quarantine Zine Library as a way to keep us together even while we’re apart. This will be followed by two hours of open unconference sessions.

What’s an Unconference session?

An unconference session is a space where the topic and form of discussion is decided by the people in the (zoom) room. For a better idea of what, why and how, see: http://zinelibraries.info/wiki/zluc2020/unconference-sessions/

05:00 – 08:30 UTC  – Yellow Photocopier Block 1

Register Here

Los Angeles (UTC -7) Milwaukee (UTC-5) Baltimore (UTC -4) Edinburgh UTC-0 Athens (UTC +2) Mumbai (UTC +5:30) Kyoto (UTC +9) Melbourne (UTC +11)
Thursday, October 29 10:00 pm Friday, October 30 12:00 AM Friday, October 30 1:00 AM Friday, October 30 5:00 AM Friday, October 30 7:00 AM Friday, October 30 10:30 AM Friday, October 30 2:00 PM Saturday, October 31 4:00 PM

Asia Art Archive
Presented by Sam and Elaine –
@asiaartarchive (ig) @asiaartarchive (twitter)

Zines at the Asia Art Archive: Join Sam and Elaine from the Asia Art Archive in Hong Kong to hear about the origins of the zine collection at AAA, the scope of the collection and how they have approached cataloguing. They will discuss how acquiring zines created by artist run spaces, creators and independent publishers active in Asia enriches narratives of collective authorship and hybrid collaboration in shared urgencies and alternative spaces. This will be followed by two hours of open unconference sessions.

What’s an Unconference session?

An unconference session is a space where the topic and form of discussion is decided by the people in the (zoom) room. For a better idea of what, why and how, see: http://zinelibraries.info/wiki/zluc2020/unconference-sessions/

 

10:00 – 13:30 UTC – Pink Stapler Block 1

Register Here

Los Angeles (UTC -7) Milwaukee (UTC-5) Baltimore (UTC -4) Edinburgh UTC-0 Athens (UTC +2) Mumbai (UTC +5:30) Kyoto (UTC +9) Melbourne (UTC +11)
Friday, October 30 3:00 AM Friday, October 30 5:00 AM Friday, October 30 6:00 AM Friday, October 30 10:00 AM Friday, October 30 12:00 AM Friday, October 30 3:30 PM Friday, October 30 7:00 PM Saturday, October 31 9:00 PM

Zine Librarian Code of Ethics
Facilitated by André Wenzel

Come and join us in discussing the Zine Librarian Code of Ethics . What does being an ethical zine librarian mean? Are there changes to the Code that should be made? This will be followed by two hours of open unconference sessions.

What’s an Unconference session?

An unconference session is a space where the topic and form of discussion is decided by the people in the (zoom) room. For a better idea of what, why and how, see: http://zinelibraries.info/wiki/zluc2020/unconference-sessions/

18:00 – 21:30 UTC – Purple Glue Stick Block 1

Register Here

Los Angeles (UTC -7) Milwaukee (UTC-5) Baltimore (UTC -4) Edinburgh UTC-0 Athens (UTC +2) Mumbai (UTC +5:30) Kyoto (UTC +9) Melbourne (UTC +11)
Friday, October 30 11:00 AM Friday, October 30 1:00 PM Friday, October 30 2:00 PM Friday, October 30 6:00 PM Friday, October 30 8:00 PM Friday, October 30 11:30 PM Saturday, October 31 03:00 AM Saturday, October 31 05:00 AM

Teaching With Zines

For learners of any age, zines can be an engaging and even transformative way to learn — whether you are teaching about science, information literacy, or even zines themselves. In this session, a panel of librarians will speak to their experiences teaching with zines with youth, college students, and the broader community. Then, we will host breakout groups for you to talk through your own dreams, fears, and ideas for teaching with zines in your own context. This will be followed by two hours of open unconference sessions.

Our panelists are:

  • Ann Matsushima Chiu is the Social Sciences Librarian at Reed College in Portland, OR. She teaches instruction and critical thinking skills through zines, leads zine workshops in the community and has organized zine fests and events for more than a decade.
  • Cathy Camper works as a youth services outreach librarian at Multnomah County Library, where she’s also a zine librarian. She’s the author of the Lowriders in Space graphic novel series, a founding member of the Portland Women of Color Zine Collective, and co-editor of the candy zine Sugar Needle.
  • Maria Cunningham is the Head of Special Collections and Archives at Reed College in Portland, OR. She started the Reed Zine Library and curates the collection rare book collections, college archives and often conducts instruction sessions and tours featuring zines.
  • Nicky Rodriguez is a queer, Puerto Rican comic artist with a passion for pushing the bounds of storytelling to explore inclusive, diverse narratives and the deconstruction of traditional narrative form. She uses comics to explore Puerto Rican culture and the multi-faceted nature of identity and has an MFA in Comics and BFA in Animation from California College of the Arts. She currently teaches art to youth virtually from Colorado on top of doing freelance illustration and comic work.

The facilitator will be Kelly McElroy.

Before the session, we invite you to take a few minutes to reflect on the questions listed on this resource page.

What’s an Unconference session?

An unconference session is a space where the topic and form of discussion is decided by the people in the (zoom) room. For a better idea of what, why and how, see: http://zinelibraries.info/wiki/zluc2020/unconference-sessions/

>>>Saturday, 31 October Schedule >>> Sunday, 1 November Schedule

Unconference sessions

What is an unconference?

This is from Eric Goldhagen’s blog and was written about Drupal Camp in NYC but applies to the IZL(u)C, too.

  • An unconference is a participant centric conference, the structure is more concerned with the value to the participants than the value for the sponsors or organizers (in a similar way that the GPL Free Software license is more concerned with the rights of the software user than the software owner)
  • At a normal conference, the hallway conversations tend to be the best parts. At an unconference, it’s all hallway!
  • unconference tries to replicate the community centric nature of Free Software projects in the way we organize an event. Everyone is a participant.
  • Whoever shows up are the right people to have here
  • Whatever happens is what is supposed to happen
  • If you find yourself in a place where you are neither learning or contributing, be respectful but use your feet to find another room where you can learn and contribute
  • Your participation is not only welcome, it’s necessary

Possible discussion topics

  • Collection development for zines in a language you don’t speak
  • Promoting zines in the classroom
  • Multi-language zine collections — how do you put them on the shelf?
  • Cataloguing: examples of catalogues, sharing practices, zine categorization/digitization, information security
  • Keeping zines safe (protecting from wear & tear and stealing)
  • Budgets & zine acquisition
  • writing funding apps for zine libraries – a how to
  • basic archival practice / record keeping skill share
  • Zines in a public library: how to start a collection, where to put a zine collection, age group
  • working with space/location limitations
  • Running a zine festival within a library
  • Experience organizing virtual events
  • Zine clubs
  • Working with young people, age appropriate zines for young people, engaging young people with zines
  • Pandemic – organizing without being physically together
  • Community Building
  • Activism & Zines/Zine Libraries
  • Showing the value of zines to administrators

Steps for facilitating an unconference session by Zoom

  • Give folks some time to get oriented and do some brainstorming of the topics they would like to discuss. You can use the chat for folks to enter their ideas, cull from the list above, and see if anything is being shared on Discord. This could take some time, but that’s okay!
  • Help get a sense of what folks are interested in — you might use the Whiteboard feature so that people can annotate, or just ask people to list their top two topics in the chat, for example. Your goal is to end up with a schedule for the rest of the time together, so people can decide where they’d like to go, when.
  • Make sure that every session has a facilitator and at least one note-taker. The facilitator role is to help keep the conversation moving and keep an eye on the time. The notetaker should jot down notes in the shared documents (links to those are posted on the main IZL(u)C page).
  • Use breakout rooms if there are multiple topics of conversation, or if any groups of people want to split off.
  • Leave up a slide or the whiteboard feature to help people get oriented if there is more than one room. Someone should stay in that main room to direct in folks who join late.
  • Zoom transcription (captions) is not a capability in breakout rooms. If someone needs live transcription, they should be a part of the main room, not a breakout room. Otter transcription may be a possibility for breakout rooms.

Tips and tricks for facilitators/participants

  • Be flexible! This is all an experiment. We will share tips throughout the weekend as we learn together how this works.
  • Make space for awkwardness and mental processing, acknowledge there will be silences and fumbling for Zoom controls, acknowledge the challenge of coming from different spaces.
  • Participants’ initial expectations may be just to sit back and watch, not necessarily active engagement, so let people know how unconferences differ from regular conferences (see the list above).
  • Make clear the different ways people can participate in Zoom: chat, have your video on, adding to shared notes, raise hand feature, etc.
  • Explore in advance tools you might want to use such as Google Jamboard and Cryptpad so you’re familiar with them before sessions.

IZLD 2020 Online Event Notes and Recordings

July 21st 2020 was International Zine Library Day! As a way of celebrating, we held virtual and multimodal events that spanned the globe and created a way for zine librarians to meet up from around the world. Three programming blocks ran from UTC 20:00 to UTC 04:00 with all kinds of events, from workshops to panels to readings (and, of course, more). The notes and recordings from these are available below. Added:

Cook Zine Presentation

Notes

Zines and the Borderlands

Notes
Video

Teaching with Zines

Notes

Tabling Round 1

Notes

Zine Librarian Pets

Notes

ZineWiki Info Sessions

Notes
Video

Make a Mini Zine

Notes
Video

QZAP Tour

Notes
Video

Tabling Round 2

Notes

Zine Libraries and Zine Librarianship Panel

Notes
Video

Australian Zinester Readings

Notes
Video

Zine Library Talk

Notes
Video

Zine Librarian Pets

 Fran Chang and Ella Vonholtum
 UTC – 23.00

Resources from Presenters:
Padlet for Top Million Pets in Zines
Fran’s website and her Etsy store

Resources from Chat:
Rochester film festival, submissions are due next week!  

Session Notes: 
Fran Chang read from her zine: Picklezine #1. She also publishes Disquiet, a halloween zine. Participants showed off their pets. Everyone’s pets are so cute! About 40% of participants have cats. 23% have dogs.

The padlet for top million pets in zines had lots of contributors add to it during this session. The discussion mostly centered around our pets and zines about pets and why do cats want to eat zines? The chat went something like this…

Zine Library Talk

  John Stevens, State Library of Victoria
  UTC – 3:30

Resources from Chat:
Polyester Books

Session Notes: 
John started at the State Library of Victoria as a new graduate in 2007, and maintained a connection with the collection zine throughout the years. He is now in a new role as full time cataloger. The zine collection at SLV started in the late 1990s, with active collection beginning in 1999. This was an uncertain time for zines and zinesters due to the blossoming of the Internet, which allowed for widespread distribution of information. Some people thought that other people wouldn’t make zines anymore, now that there were online alternatives available. 

Two librarians at SLV went to Paul, the owner of Polyester Books (see image below) in Sydney, asking Paul to collect one of each new zine that was sold by the store. While some zines shifted online, people were still making zines, but less about sharing information and more about personal connections and insights. The base of people making zines continued increasing through the early 2000s. Eloise at the Victoria State Library was connected with the Sticky Institute, and a new connection between SLV and Sticky was formed. Polyester Books closed in 2016.

Zines are difficult to classify and describe, they often lack standardized information and don’t have ISBNs or other standard numbers. The Octopod in Newcastle (This is not art conglomerate) accrued zine donations, but struggled to arrange/collect them (arranging by size, by color, etc.); eventually their collection became part of Newcastle Public Library. SLV is a “gatekeeping institution,” and zines are in special collections, which makes dealing with zinesters fraught with institutional rules–they can seem off putting to creators and people who wish to view the collection. No browsing is permitted, which curtails serendipitous discovery. 

The value of the SLV’s zine collection will be revealed in time, especially for its usefulness to researchers and academics, e.g. those looking into third wave feminism. There’s so much zine material being published, but it’s ephemeral which makes it difficult to collect everything. There will never be an exhaustive collection of zines. Also, some creators do not want their zines to be added to the collection. It’s important to respect that, zine collections can not exist without the goodwill of the zine community.

In 2017 there was a touring zine exhibition of zines and artists’ books started at SLV, which toured art spaces, libraries, and rural areas throughout Australia. Zines were made for the exhibition that people could handle freely. Another event Zine-a Warrior Print-fest happened in the library [or at Museum of Contemporary Art??? missed this], multiple zinesters tabled. 

As for the future of zine librarianship and zines in Australia: John sees collecting of zines continuing in libraries. He sees the need for those in libraries to recognize zines as a medium which is distinct from other media, and is driven by an ideological approach to DIY production. The zine community continues to grow. John sees an emerging interest in zines in librarianship as ephemeral creative production. Libraries have been impacted strongly by COVID and adapting quickly. Distances in Australia lead to challenges in connecting to each other; there is a need for libraries to be intentional in maintaining connections and keeping momentum in supporting zine communities.

Australian Zinester Readings

Mia Nie, Bailey Sharp, Tegan Webb 
UTC – 3:00

Resources from Presenters:
Tegan’s zines available through Small Zine Volcano distro or Etsy 
Mia’s Twitter, Insta and Comics
“Lone Shadow” comic and companion essay “You, Defeated” 
Bailey’s Insta and works at Glom Press

Resources from Chat:
All three readers volunteer
at Sticky Institute
Other Worlds Zine Fair in Sydney (2020 online version) 

Session Notes: 
Tegan read the first four pages of their contribution to April 7th, 2020 zine. It was about getting back into heavy metal which you used to listen to, but felt like you grew out of, specifically Lacuna Coil. Is one responding to nostalgia when you enjoy it or do you actually like this music once again? She tries an experiment to listenTrying it back out with a heavy metal radio show hosted by a woman on ____ (radio station)

Mia read Lone Shadow, a comic about Sekiro, a video game where you play a one armed ninja who through death and rebirth becomes honed into an “untouchable killing machine”. She related the game to transitioning, and touched on phenomenology, creating the self, and the possibility of transitioning as an exploration and play with ways of being in the world. What kind of life do I want to live with others? 

Bailey read “The Big Report” a comic about zoomers, and their future reactions to environmental catastrophe, about living in the end and how new children come into the world nihilistic. In it even the apocalypse disappoints in the end when the world is saved. But when those nihilistic children inevitably have children of their own, and they see how sloppy those children become, the zoomers then in turn destroy the world for their own children because that is the “decent thing to do–as we all do”. 

Zine Libraries and Zine Librarianship Panel

Marya Errin Jones, Rhonda Kauffman, Kiyoshi Murakami, Ziba Zehdar

UTC – 2:00

Resources from Presenters:

Morning Zine Circle at Cafe Phalam in Kyoto
http://www.arsvi.com/w/mk02.htm
http://www.washingtoncenterforthebook.org/covid-19zine/
https://quarantinezineclub.neocities.org/
https://zines.barnard.edu/news/who-better-document-experience-everyone
https://view.joomag.com/our-stories-matter-life-in-the-time-of-covid-19-june-2020/0356379001591036473?short&
https://www.sherwoodforestzinelibrary.org/
https://glasgowzinelibrary.com/
https://www.portlandzinesymposium.org/

Session Notes: 

Introductions:
Rhonda Kauffman is moderating this panel discussion about zine libraries and zine librarianship, hopes, dreams, etc. Rhonda is a cataloger and metadata management librarian at the University of Connecticut, and tries to start a zine collection wherever they go. Has been making zine since they were a kid. There a punk rock zine archival collection at the current library, and they donated their own personal collection of 90s punk zines to it.  

Marya Erinn Jones is based in Albuquerque. Marya is a librarian for a 600-700 title zine collection hosted at the Tannex, a “room of requirement” like performance space she also runs. This is located in Barelas. Marya came to zines from friends and lovers, and is the founder of ABQ zine fest, 10 years ago. 

Ziba Perez Zehdar currently works at the Los Angles public library and has run a circulating zine collection for the past three years there. Ziba had previously worked at the Long Beach public library, and founded a circulating zine circulating while there. First came across circulating zines at the library during a visit to the Salt Lake City Public Library in 2014 while doing other zine programming within the Orange County Public Library System.  Loves zines and working with zines in the public library. 

Kiyoshi Murakami‘s main research subject is the zines, anarchy, and  demonstration movement. Visiting researcher at the Ritsumeikan University, Institute of Ars Vivendi in Kyoto and is a part time lecturer. He is a barefoot zine librarian, and since 2016 has organized a zine library.  Missed a lot about where they work/connection to uni. Facilitator of the monthly Morning Zine Circle at Cafe Phalam in Kyoto – Nijo, Japan since October 2016. There, a small zine library is collected, consisting of zines donated by visiting zinesters, and articles about zine culture. 

RK: How has your zine library affected your community?

KM: The zine library was made by the zine circle, ad has been run as a co-op. The zine circle is not composed of just zinesters, but has members who didn’t know about zines or DIY culture. has taught its community about DIY and zine culture. The zine circle library is not only a place for zines, but has acted as a communication hub and learning spot in the local community.

ZPZ: LBPL has in partnership with LB zine fest collection. This draws in many visitors to the collection, and the library receives donated copies of zines people table there. LAPL tries to localize zinesters zines to their 73 local branches, trying to collect at a branch zines from zinesters in that neighborhood.  

MEJ: Albuquerque had a very strong anarchist culture in the 90s, but it went underground. ABQ zine fest was founded 10 years ago, and the library was seeded from that, as well as submissions gather from other zine fests in the surrounding area.  The zine library has been able to sometimes offer open hours, it varied seasonally, but had been able to open the collection for browsing before performances in the space. zine culture has helped the community blossom, in terms of communicating in a literary form. Zine fest happened last year out of the National Hispanic Cultural Center. Zine outreach, encouraging both people to come to the zine fest, as well as make their own zines, happens throughout the year. Its really important to get folks to create their own because their are so many stories that need to be told. 

RK: An important part of community is getting people have a tactile experience, having a zine workshop or having folks get hands on with zines, learning about their use as a primary source, and then having them go to the archive and actually use them for research. Having sessions with different parts of the community, and letting them know what is around, and being able to speak their truth, can be pretty magical. 

RK: We’ve been speaking a lot about zinefest, what is your connection to them?

ZPZ: One of the co-organizers of the Long Beach Zinefest.. During the ZLuC which was hosted by the Long Beach Public Library there was a panel at the fest of zine librarians speaking. It was great to introduce the public to the library.

RK: Zines in times of strife? What role do zines play during times of social unrest? Do you have any special collections of zines that document social movements or zines that help people work through social movements?

MEJ: I’m not sure that you see the effects right away of the work you are doing, but several years ago in Sweden there was an incident after a womens march where women were attacked. Marya collected about 200 zines from all over and took them with her to Sweden to donate to the Stockholm library, where 6+ years later that collection still circulates today. 

Zines have a shelf life, and don’t last forever in a circulating collection, but not after you’ve read them and put them somewhere inside your body, you will carry them with you. That’s the power of  writing zines today, through the pain, that they might not have power in that moment, but it might ignite something later. Reading, sharing, and looking at zines is very inspiring. 

KM: The collection contains zines relating to environmental, anti-base, desegregation, and other local grassroots movements. The zine circle usually discusses zines about these topics. Try and promote a strong connecting between zine culture and local grassroots organizing. 

The most recent publication of the zine circle consisted of writing from five members which were edited together and posted online. Next month, they will collect again for the next issue. 

ZPZ: Baldwin hillis library has a weekly bilingual adult zine workshop, hosted by a non-profit called DSTL arts. They would have different topics, and library patrons contribute pages to it. 

RK: BIPOC in zines and zine librarianship, what stories do you have? Both about being a librarian and collecting.

RK: Interesting intersection of roles between being a librarian of color, a person of color, zinester, and working in academia. Large movements happening right now about collection development and librarianship about embracing the values of diversity, inclusion, equity, and social justice. But talking the talk  and walking the walk are very different things. 

At her last institution, had applied for a grant to get collection off of the ground, 3 different times they tried to get it off the ground. Had a group of people who were excited about the project, but felt like while the institution said they wanted diverse, marginalized voices, when it came down to it, they didn’t want to deal with the collection, and acted in racist ways. These kinds of collections are an easy way to get access to marganizaled voices, who don’t have a voice in major publishing streams.

MEJ: At many zinefest where she is one of only very few brown people there, or all the brown people end up grouped together at the same table. Founded ABQ Zinefest to try and change this. One of the only black women founding a zine fest. How can I be a part of a culture that doesn’t reflect me? Just because she writes a zine doesn’t make it a “black zine”. Population 3% black, 1% black female. She often “has to look in the mirror to see another black woman”. Tries to use the ABQ zine fest to broaden inclusion, getting people to write their zines and their stories.  

There is a zine in being a black woman working from home. About how you live that life and how you get that life. Working from home has changed her life in a major way. Why its important to have flexibility as a person of color in your work life.  Microaggressions and similar things build up, and take time to release. Learning how to wield her writer and zinester self at home. Zines are for transformation. 

Albuquerque Zine library is a very feminist zine library, with lots of POC zines (although there always could be more). Figuring out how to grow that in this time take some time to figure out. 

KM: Zine library has not have a BIPOC category. In japan there are different minorities in Japan, who have been discriminated against historically. The few zines that specialize about their issues. We have to realize the power that the majority has over the minority in our work.

ZPZ: In last 5 years as a zine librarian, has been collecting bilingual and foreign language zines. Has been buying spanish language zines in Mexico. Goes to Tijuana zine fest to collect as well. Once she went looking for zines in Cuba. She hopes to find zines in Farsi some day. 

RK: Hopes and dreams for zine libraries?

MEJ: Accessible, in a multitude of languages, that stories that want to be told and need to be told are available to us. We need to take stock of our lives, realize that they are worth sharing, and document what is important. 

Not having a zine fest in October to organize has left her wondering what to do, she has been looking at what other zine communities are doing right now to still move on and hopes for support to make something happen because we need something at this time. Embracing digital is new, but still wants to capture some of the tactileness even without touch. She hopes that future zine fest will be accessible to all of us. 

RK: Loves the idea of college kids sharing, Has had professors bringing up zine programs, wanting to make zines as a part of class. What can digital zines become? Animations? What will the next iteration hold? Record those voices not being heard otherwise or being shut out of conversation. 

KM: Cooperation between zine libraries within Japan. Further, expanding the network to Asia. Japan zine scene weak links to grassroots and radical networks in Asia, and wants to grow and strengthen those connections.

ZPZ: A public zine collection for every public library. Online browseable zine catalogs. More partnerships between zine fests and zine libraries!

Q&A: What are folks doing in their zine communities to maintain it during this time?

RK: Has had zooms groups to do show and tell of crafts, knitting groups, could use this approach to have people show off their zine areas,   

MJ: Hasn’t been having virtual programs, this time has been a time of recovery. But has been meeting weekly with zine fest co organizer weekly. Wants to figure it out, and feels like it has to be through zoom. 

Z: Has attended Portland zine symp has a zoom event, has attended a number of events. Recently with Liz Yerby and it had a series of illustration prompts and folks shared their artwork. 

RK: Thank you for speaking about zine libraries!